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Hungerhill School Hungerhill
School

English

The English curriculum at Hungerhill School is exciting, enjoyable, and varied. It can broaden your outlook and introduce you to many new areas, not just in literature but in public speaking and presentation. English is about creative thinking and then being able to articulate successfully and translate those ideas into an understandable form. It develops analytical and evaluative skills that translate into real-world scenarios and impact on every subject your child will study.

Mrs R Ryan
Curriculum Leader

In English we aim to develop:

  • an appreciation and understanding of the English language
  • a love of literature (poetry, plays, and novels)
  • communication skills (both speaking and listening)
  • reading comprehension
  • technical accuracy (spelling, punctuation, and grammar)
  • writing skills (creative, letter, emphatic, argument, persuasion, etc.)

English KS3

Main skills developed in Year 7: Main skills developed in Year 8:
  • ​identifying key themes and characters in texts
  • selecting evidence to support views
  • collating information from a range of sources
  • developing vocabulary
  • oracy
  • organising writing into paragraphs
  • using a range of punctuation and sentence types
  • developing different genres of writing, including narrative, descriptive, informative, and persuasive
  • developing personal responses to literacy texts
  • summarising a range of information from different sources
  • using a range of sentence structures and varied vocabulary for effect
  • adapting speech to a range of contexts
  • developing analytical responses to texts from different sources
  • developing and improving different styles of writing, including narrative, descriptive, informative, argumentative, and persuasive
​How parents can help to support their son's/daughter's learning in Year 7: ​​​How parents can help to support their son's/daughter's learning in Year 8:
  • encourage use of a dictionary and thesaurus
  • encourage reviewing of written work and re-drafting for improved technical accuracy
  • encourage reading for pleasure through visits to libraries and book shops, and by supporting Readathon and the Accelerated Reader programme
  • encourage use of a dictionary and thesaurus
  • encourage reviewing of written work and re-drafting for improved technical accuracy
  • encourage reading for pleasure through visits to libraries and book shops, and by supporting Readathon and the Accelerated Reader programme
  • support with home learning and I am Learning
  • support with literacy skills, including: spelling, punctuation, and grammar
  • draw your child's attention to items of interest in newspapers
  • encourage your child to examine all texts critically, e.g. leaflets, letters, articles, web pages, etc.

English KS4

Exam Board:

AQA

Qualification:

English GCSE

English Literature GCSE

Both qualifications are 100% examination.

Outline of course content:

Students will develop the following skills:

  • speaking, listening, and communication
  • reading
  • writing

Outline of course structure:

Reading:     

During Years 9, 10 and 11, you will read a number of texts and complete work based around these in preparation for the examination.  You will study a Shakespeare play, novels, short stories, and non-fiction texts. You will complete a range of assessments throughout each year that will prepare you for your examinations and develop your skills as a critical and evaluative reader. This will help to support your understanding in all other subjects.

 

Speaking and listening:

You will have a range of opportunities – including formal talks, interviews, discussions and group work – to display skills in spoken English. These communication skills will support you with your learning elsewhere in the school, as well as equipping you with the confidence to use language verbally for your education and future career.

 

Writing:

You will produce a range of written work, including narratives, diaries, letters, discursive and descriptive pieces. Not only will you work to create your own imaginative pieces, but you will learn to write formally, using Standard English effectively, and will be offered regular opportunities to learn from ‘real life’ examples. You will be encouraged to redraft your work and will gain the ability to self-check your spelling, punctuation and grammar, in preparation for examinations and your future careers.  Like your reading, writing will be assessed in regular assessments throughout each year and then in a full examination in the summer term.

 

Careers using English

It’s everywhere! Can you think of a job which doesn’t involve, at least, some of the following:
  • speaking to people – face to face, phone calls, individuals, and groups
  • reading – information, plans, reports, e-mails, manuals, instructions, guides
  • writing – reports, notes for colleagues, e-mails, tweets
  • for EVERY career, ability with English is an advantage.

Skills and how the subject relates to work:

Every day we’re all required to:
  • communicate with others – customers, colleagues, clients
  • follow written instructions and procedures
  • read, understand, and use information we receive in writing
  • write things down for others to read – notes, reports, e-mail

Potential jobs:

The following may appeal to those who really enjoy English:
 
Writers – authors, journalists, reporters, website bloggers, researchers. Writing words to inform, entertain, amuse.
 
Media work – radio / TV, advertising, and public relations. We constantly hear ‘words’ on the TV, radio, online, in advertising campaigns, in speeches by politicians – who writes these?
 
Teaching - universities, colleges, and schools. Perhaps you’d like to pass on your love of English to someone else? Teaching English to speakers of other languages is also a rapidly growing industry.
 
Legal work – Solicitors and barristers usually have outstanding English skills to read complex documents, produce reports, and speak in court.

Also imagine you’re a:

Social worker, accountant, psychologist – you’ll write notes and reports. You’ll spend all day talking to people and helping them understand their problems.
 
Medical jobs (Doctor, speech therapist, nurse, radiographer, dietician, occupational therapist, and lots more) - you’ll be writing notes, producing reports, understanding new ways of working, receiving written information about new methods and techniques.
 
Architects, builders, and engineers – you’ll be following written instructions, researching new developments, presenting your ideas to customers, and writing reports.