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IMPORTANT INformation - Exam contingency day june 2020 

FAO - Parents/Carers of students in Year 11

To avoid any possible issues during the exam season this summer, please read the following information.

Students will be given their individual exam timetables which will highlight when their final exam is scheduled to take place. The summer written exam period will run from Monday 11th May to Tuesday 16th June 2020.  In addition to this, there is a Summer 2020 exam series Exam Contingency Day that is selected by the examination awarding bodies.  All students must be aware of and be available for this date.

This contingency day for GCSE examinations has been put in place “in the event of widespread, sustained national or local disruption to examinations during the summer examination series.” The decision comes following the tragic events of recent years, namely the Manchester attacks and the Grenfell Tower fire.

The Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ) have decided that they need the option to postpone an exam (or exams) in the event of an incident and rearrange them for a later date to allow all students a fair and equal chance. The date that has been set aside as the contingency day this year is Wednesday 24th June 2020. This means that all exam candidates must be available to sit exams from the date of their first exam until Wednesday 24th June 2020. This decision is not a school decision and applies to all candidates in all schools across the country. Please can all students/parents/carers make a note of the contingency exam date in the event that an awarding body needs to invoke its contingency plan.

Exam Revision Strategies 

Draw up a revision timetable

Research shows that shorter 20-30 minute spells work best, because your concentration is much higher. We therefore recommend taking short, frequent breaks. We also advise to mix the order order of the subjects.

 

Exercise

Physical activity is very important, in particular during intense study time. Even going for a small 30-minute jog after a day of revision will make a huge difference to your wellbeing. Physical activity increases heart rate which makes the blood circulate faster. This in turn ensures that brain gets more oxygen which increases productivity whilst reducing tiredness and stress.

 

Find a quiet space

This is a pretty straightforward one: you desperately need a place where you can be uninterrupted for a few hours. Your room, local or your school/university library will do. Be careful with revising in a coffee shop such as Starbucks. It is a popular option, however it does not work for everybody and people often get distracted!

 

Get down to it in the morning

You have to make a start at some point and doing it sooner rather than later is a very good idea. Try to stick to our draft revision schedule and start revising in the morning - research shows that you are more likely to do all the planned work if you start early, because as it gets closer to the evening, there is bigger tendency to get outside.

 

Spice up your revision

Use a bit of colour! Drawing colourful learning maps will help you to memorise facts. What is even more interesting is the fact that colourful notes are easier to memorise than plain black and white ones. Give it a go!

 

Do plenty of past papers

Ask your teacher for some past papers or google them yourself. Most exam boards nowadays put a lot of emphasis on exam technique and simply familiarising yourself with it before the exam can often save you time and help to earn marks at the exam. A lot of examiners do not bother with inventing terribly innovative questions once you have done three or four past papers chances are that some of questions that come on the day will look familiar.